Fleece Liners by Totsbots

Fleece Liners are reusable 100% polyester fleece (similar to fine clothing fleece, not sheep fleece!), providing an effective stay dry nappy layer as well as a poo catcher. Wash at 60 with the nappies. Cost effective as used birth to potty.

Available in packs of 10

Stock:  

66 in stock, ready to go!  

66 in stock, ready to go!

Our Price:  £6.39
RRP:  £7.99
Saving Of:  20%

Brand:  TotsBots
Size:  12x34cm

Fleece Liners are 100% polyester fleece (similar to fine clothing fleece, not sheep fleece!), providing an effective stay dry layer as well as a poo catcher. Wash at 60 with the nappies. Please note that fleece does need to be prewashed a couple of times, otherwise liquid runs off it rather than through it.

Totsbots fleece liners come in packs of 10 and are wonderful thick quality fleece.


Let me tell you a bit about the event which converted me to fleece liners, having always been pretty sceptical when others raved about them:
I flew to Orkney with my first son, and he did not do his usual morning poo before we left (normally as regular as clockwork), so we had it hanging over us like the Sword of Damocles all morning.  At Gatwick, I changed him again, in case he had sneakily done it en route - no poo.  By the time we got to Aberdeen, he finally decided to perform, at which point I realised I had used my only spare nappy and the rest were on the plane.  The nappy itself had plenty more capacity for wee - the only problem was the dirty liner.  However, luckily I had put on a fleece liner rather than a flushable one. I say 'luckily' because fleece has the following huge advantages:

Being quite large, it covers the whole nappy area, and so poo is far less likely to even hit the nappy in the first place (with paper liners, they can tend to move out of the firing line once baby is old enough to wriggle).

Being quite thick, no staining goes through to the nappy once your baby is weaned.  This means that if your child poos in a fresh nappy, you can just replace the fleece. You couldn’t really do this with a flushable liner.  Also, this protects the nappy somewhat from the curry stains a pre-weaning breastfed baby is so fond of producing.

Being 100% polyester, the liner is completely non-absorbent, and so provides an effective stay-dry layer. Not essential by any means, but parents seem to like it, and it is certainly nice to keep a very wet night nappy at bay.  It also cleans easily and dries immediately, so on our trip to Orkney I was able to drop the poo into the loo, hand wash the fleece and wring it dry then blast it under the hand drier for a few seconds before putting it back on the nappy for reuse.  Twice, thanks to a repeat performance by Bob!

Once you have bought them, there are no ongoing liner costs or the hassle of making sure you don’t run out.  Poo drops off a fleece liner very easily into the toilet for the most part.  Even relatively squidgy ones will usually drop off if you turn the liner over into an upside down rainbow shape and wiggle your hands a bit.  If the worst comes to the worst, “picking” at one end of the poo with a piece of toilet paper is usually enough to start it peeling itself off (how much detail do you really want on “poo management”?!).  Actually, the easiest thing to do is just to drop the fleece into the loo and leave it for a few minutes.  When you lift it out, most of the poo will have come off anyway - the only risk is, you might forget it’s there and flush it away.

Fleece Liners are 100% polyester fleece (similar to fine clothing fleece, not sheep fleece!), providing an effective stay dry layer as well as a poo catcher. Wash at 60 with the nappies. Please note that fleece does need to be prewashed a couple of times, otherwise liquid runs off it rather than through it.

Let me tell you a bit about the event which converted me to fleece liners, having always been pretty sceptical when others raved about them:
I flew to Orkney with my first son, and he did not do his usual morning poo before we left (normally as regular as clockwork), so we had it hanging over us like the Sword of Damocles all morning.  At Gatwick, I changed him again, in case he had sneakily done it en route - no poo.  By the time we got to Aberdeen, he finally decided to perform, at which point I realised I had used my only spare nappy and the rest were on the plane.  The nappy itself had plenty more capacity for wee - the only problem was the dirty liner.  However, luckily I had put on a fleece liner rather than a flushable one. I say 'luckily' because fleece has the following huge advantages:

Being quite large, it covers the whole nappy area, and so poo is far less likely to even hit the nappy in the first place (with paper liners, they can tend to move out of the firing line once baby is old enough to wriggle).

Being quite thick, no staining goes through to the nappy once your baby is weaned.  This means that if your child poos in a fresh nappy, you can just replace the fleece. You couldn’t really do this with a flushable liner.  Also, this protects the nappy somewhat from the curry stains a pre-weaning breastfed baby is so fond of producing.

Being 100% polyester, the liner is completely non-absorbent, and so provides an effective stay-dry layer. Not essential by any means, but parents seem to like it, and it is certainly nice to keep a very wet night nappy at bay.  It also cleans easily and dries immediately, so on our trip to Orkney I was able to drop the poo into the loo, hand wash the fleece and wring it dry then blast it under the hand drier for a few seconds before putting it back on the nappy for reuse.  Twice, thanks to a repeat performance by Bob!

Once you have bought them, there are no ongoing liner costs or the hassle of making sure you don’t run out.  Poo drops off a fleece liner very easily into the toilet for the most part.  Even relatively squidgy ones will usually drop off if you turn the liner over into an upside down rainbow shape and wiggle your hands a bit.  If the worst comes to the worst, “picking” at one end of the poo with a piece of toilet paper is usually enough to start it peeling itself off (how much detail do you really want on “poo management”?!).  Actually, the easiest thing to do is just to drop the fleece into the loo and leave it for a few minutes.  When you lift it out, most of the poo will have come off anyway - the only risk is, you might forget it’s there and flush it away.

 

UK Delivery from £2.50 or Free options over £40

We have lots of delivery options for you to choose from. You'll be given the opportunity at checkout to choose your delivery method or option. The site will automatically choose the  tracked option for you initially as this tracks and insures your delivery. Sometimes when we come to pack an order, if it's unusually heavy, bulky or valuable, we reserve the right to upgrade your delivery method free of charge to another that's more secure. For example, we may upgrade your order from first class delivery to courier.

Average Rating (1 Review):  
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Rating:  
Much better than the disposable ones
Saturday, 23 March 2019  | 

So far we've tried the spun lace disposable liners. And these fleece ones. We now only use the fleece ones. For runny newborn poo they're a brilliant barrier to the main nappy. And for wet nappies they let the water through so the nappy feels dryer for baby.

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